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Art History, Artists and Anything Art!

Hello and welcome to the Lilith Press Magazine's section for articles about Art History, Artists and Anything Art!

Cuz making art is just that ridiculously awesome. Check out some of the art pieces we've posted up here. :)

Some of the artists and art pieces we showcase here may be controversial or funny or both. Some of them may also be of a more serious nature. If you don't like them, that isn't our problem. Contact the artist if you don't like what they did. Don't send us hatemail if you don't like the art. We don't care if you don't like it. WE LIKE IT. So there. :p

Sincerely,
Suzanne MacNevin
Lilith Press Magazine

La Nona Ora / The Ninth Hour

This sculpture was made in 2000 (and then photographed of course) by Maurizio Cattelan. It is, unabashedly, hilariously funny and poking fun at whether "God" really does control everything.

Or whether stuff just happens.

Or whether "God" doesn't really like the Pope.

Any way you look at it, this is a sculpture that is both funny and makes you think.

It is also a little bit of "science vs religion", wherein the meteor is a factual object that can be studied in person, and god is a somewhat fictional entity that has yet to be proven to exist. Facts Vs Faith, in other words.

What I also find amusing is that the Pope just seems to be laying there. Not so much injured, just there. Maybe the artist didn't want it to be too gory.

In light of the death of Pope John Paul II, and the more recent resignation of Pope Benedict following multiple sex scandals involving the Catholic Church and young boys, it is nice to see the Catholic Church has finally found a new Pope - Pope Francis from Argentina. In which case it is well past time that Pope be from a region where the Catholic religion has the most dominance (South America has more Catholics than any other part of the world).

On an artistic level this sculpture is fantastic, utilizing multiple elements to create a realistic and recognizable image. Managing to convey multiple meanings at the same time (some of which are funny due to the irony).

If you want to see more artwork like this I recommend Googling the name of the artist: Maurizio Cattelan.


Is gothic art dead?

Ah, now that is complicated. Goth culture as a movement is comprised of fashion, music, art - and while it tends to be dark and moody, it is full of unique ways of expressing oneself.

Let us take for example music. Some musicians, eg. Melodic Euphoria, are pretty new to the music scene and continue to make goth music in the tradition of Inkubus Sukkubus, Evanescence and other great goth bands... but still manage to come with a very unique musical style that is all their own.

Same goes with gothic artists. Let us take for example Charles Moffat, who doesn't only make gothic art but also does political work and portraits too (and commissions for American / British TV shows). I have decided to showcase examples of his gothic paintings here. I picked Charles Moffat because as gothic artists go you really can't beat the guy who wrote the Neo-Gothic Art Manifesto.

But here is the thing. Charles Moffat doesn't make gothic art any more. His more recent paintings have gone in a different direction (no, not landscapes, just a different direction that isn't gothic any more).

And he isn't alone. What was once a very robust gothic subculture in the 1990s and 2000s has dwindled dramatically in the last number of years. As subcultures go heavy metal, emo and steampunk are now in vogue. Out of these three heavy metal is closest to goth, but steampunk is definitely the kewlest of the three.

But maybe in another decade we shall see a rivival in gothic culture. Or maybe something new will come along. Very difficult to say and predict.

It is true however that not all remnants of gothic culture are gone. Many of the shops are gone however. No longer will you find clothing stores dedicated solely to gothic fashion except in really big cities. Most of those stores disappeared before or during the Great Recession in 2007-2009. These days most gothic clothing stores operate online and are owned by people operating out of their apartment where they handmake corsets and other finery.

So perhaps we should say is that gothic art / culture is now "undead". Refuses to die completely.

And it will return someday.

Mwahahahaahaha!

Now does that mean it will become known by a new name? Post-Gothic Art? Like Post-Impressionism? Maybe. We shall have to wait and see.



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